Erecura (also found as Herecura, Aerecura, Eracura) was a goddess worshipped in ancient times, often thought to be Celtic in origin,
mostly represented with the attributes of Proserpina and associated with the Roman underworld god Dis Pater. She appears with the latter in a statue found at Oberseebach, Switzerland and in several magical texts from Austria, once in the company of Cerberus, another, probably, with Ogmios. A further inscription to her has been found near Stuttgart, Germany. She may originally have been an earth goddess, associated with such attributes of fertility as the cornucopia and apple baskets; she may also have been associated with Silvanus and the Rhine Valley. Green describes Aericura as a ‘Gaulish Hecuba.’
Representations of Erecura are most commonly found in the Danubian area of Southern Germany and Slovenia, but they also occur in Italy, Great Britain, and France. Her inscriptions are concentrated in Stuttgart and along the Rhine.
A male deity called Arecurius or Aericurus is named on an altar-stone in Northumberland, England.

Erecura (also found as Herecura, Aerecura, Eracura) was a goddess worshipped in ancient times, often thought to be Celtic in origin,

mostly represented with the attributes of Proserpina and associated with the Roman underworld god Dis Pater. She appears with the latter in a statue found at OberseebachSwitzerland and in several magical texts from Austria, once in the company of Cerberus, another, probably, with Ogmios. A further inscription to her has been found near Stuttgart, Germany. She may originally have been an earth goddess, associated with such attributes of fertility as the cornucopia and apple baskets; she may also have been associated with Silvanus and the Rhine Valley. Green describes Aericura as a ‘Gaulish Hecuba.’

Representations of Erecura are most commonly found in the Danubian area of Southern Germany and Slovenia, but they also occur in Italy, Great Britain, and France. Her inscriptions are concentrated in Stuttgart and along the Rhine.

A male deity called Arecurius or Aericurus is named on an altar-stone in Northumberland, England.